We can also make pesto from this herb

Years ago, I saw an interesting inscription on the refrigerator. On the door, where we usually had letters or recipes cut from magazines or idiot magnets we bought at an automatic moment during the flight, they only had one inscription. “Think, then open,” he said. I didn’t quite understand, I didn’t ask, but it stuck in my memory. When I open the fridge and don’t know exactly what to look for, I remember that inscription. A light illuminates the cool interior, and I run my eyes between the shelves to find something. It’s not just about hunger, it’s about a vague need for something. What do I have in the fridge for moments like these? Almost nothing, I practically don’t buy food in packages anymore so homemade pesto sauce always saves me.

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Pesto is a great spread for baking, I mix it with hot pasta, buckwheat porridge, and couscous, I finish soups and sauces with it, I mix it with salad dressing, and I put it on an already baked pizza. Pesto is an indispensable container in the refrigerator.

So far, we’ve always prepared only chamomile, because that’s the only way I know of to keep some medicinal chamomile out of season. Of course, the most famous is the basil pesto, which is also the only real Italian pesto. Pesto alla Genovese is traditionally prepared with basil, olive oil, pine nuts, pecorino and garlic. The complete surprise for me was the parsley pesto, which we made this year only because the perch was full of beautiful green foliage. Sometimes a problem arises even if a good thing is too much. Pesto is a great solution, the taste and active ingredients in the oil practically do not change. Preserve the green parts of the plants by chopping them up, salting them and pouring high-quality oil over them while mixing. Everything should be well soaked in oil. If the axle will be in the refrigerator for a few weeks, it is not worth saving the oil. When I think of the hub, the oil may be less.

The parsley pesto encouraged me to put most of the cilantro seeds in small pots.

Fans of this aromatic herb know that they bloom very quickly, so there is no need to wait.

Now I have a solution in the fridge for all cases of sudden hunger or lack of culinary imagination. The rest of the cilantro has already grown a meter well and blooms very well. It is visited by bumblebees and bumblebees and that is good too.

The solution to all occasions of sudden hunger!

Coriander pesto

  • Huge bunch of fresh coriander
  • 200 ml of olive oil
  • A handful of cashews (or pine nuts and almonds)
  • Sol

Prepare

1. Chop or grind nuts separately. A useful coffee grinder, which, of course, should be coffee-free.

2. Clean the cilantro. Thin, soft stems can move to the axis, and even more difficult, the leaves that you can not break will grind poorly.

3. Press the coriander, oil, salt and ground nuts into a blender. Salt to taste, no need to oversalt. Mix to the desired density, add oil if necessary. In principle, pesto should be soft, but not like cream, it is more brown-grained. Instead, blend a few times and pause in between so the blades don’t heat up. If possible, set the mixer to low turns. It may be necessary to press the axle onto the blades in the meantime.

4. Load the axle into small glass jars with lids two inches below the rim. Spray it with oil so that at least an inch remains on the edge. Axle size increases over time. It is best to fill several small jars to open them immediately. If you are taking pesto from a larger jar, crush what is left and pour a thin layer of oil over it. Store it in the refrigerator or at least in a cool, dark place.

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Beba and Hana Splichal

The kitchen is the heart of the home and the most important things that happen in the heart. Our vegan, eco, and waste-free kitchen is small, but has a large table and a garden door. Hana cooks, photos and talks with wild yeast, the child writes everything, down to the smallest details. Aromas of Indian spices, warm bread and fresh recipes.

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